This be the wonderous stuff.

INTERVIEW.

1. You’ve got some deep, throbbing beats Mr.! What’s some major non-musical influences for you?

Deep and throbbing, eh?  thanks.  I suppose that works.  not safe for work I don’t think, but like I always say “if it’s good enough for cable television, it’s good enough for me”.

I never say that, but if i did it would likely be true. I digress. Non-musical influences?  um.  Mostly philosophy texts.  Not to highbrow my position, but during grad school I read a lot from thinkers like Deleuze, Foucault, and Marx.  Not surprisingly all are pretty huge in terms of how I sort the world; both musically and otherwise.  I’m also a terrible rockclimbing addict which tends to keep me pretty occupied as well.  I’m out at the Red River Gorge climbing pretty much all the time as of late.

2. Where does the name come from?

The name actually comes out of my approach to music and being.  In my mind, I’m just (re)assembling past musical ideas, structures, and other assemblies.  I didn’t design the Juno 106.  I’m not responsible for verse/chorus/bridge dynamics.  but I know what they are and I utilize them/arrange to the best of my abilities.  basically I’m like a music assembly machine in a field of sonic possibility; the milieu…  that is, my music is often more about the context than it is about me.

3. Was there a certain event where you said, “I must be involved with electronic music!”? Some moment of realization?

Oddly enough there was.  I was at a house party in 1993 and thought to myself, “hey i like this.”  A few years later I had a pair of 1200’s.  a few years after that I had a few thousand pounds of house records.  and in the future (now), I’m writing tunes.

4. How would you describe the mood or environment of your music?

Hm.  It depends on what I’m going for when I sit down in the studio.  Most of the time I tend to move somewhere between beach vibes and dusty bass-swallowed basements.  Of course, this is always changing depending on who I’m listening to or particular ideas I’m trying to sort.

5. How has 2010 been for you musically? Anything you’re moving towards in 2011?

This year was great.  I had a well-reviewed 12″ release on Subeena’s Opit imprint and a guestmix on Mary Anne Hobbs before she retired.  If i had a list of goals for 2010 (I didn’t really), then I far exceeded them with just these two items.  But I think I’ll remember this year for the amazing ‘industry’ friendships I’ve found.  I’ve been fortunate in that most of my musical collaborations (labels, publishers, and partners) are with really easy-going and mostly hilarious people; you know ‘real’ people.  I’ve avoided assholes and it makes the labor of music far more enjoyable.  It is these sorts of relationships that have me really very excited for 2011.  I just signed a publishing deal with London’s Reprise Publishing and I have releases coming out on Saigon, Night Audio, West Norwood Cassette Library, Fortified Audio, Opit, Trouble Brewing, and Soul Motive.  On top of this deluge of releases I’m also really excited to be working on a hip-hop album for a very talented local MC named Ian Sethi.  I like writing house/techno tunes, but all always have a soft spot for hip-hop and slow breaks.
Basically 2011 will mark the beginning (or the explosive end:)) of my music ‘career’.  so, in either case it’s gonne be pretty exciting.
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Anytime I get positive feedback from people with good taste in music.  that’s what it is all about.  i think they talk about it in the film Almost Famous?  —  the nod.  seriously, it’s all about the nod.  it’s fun when people dig your stuff.
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XX-  JIMI JAXON

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